About your Search

20131028
20131105
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5
everybody else is doing it too. they claim some of the information came from nato allies, not u.s. spying. greece has admitted to spying on the u.s. and others in the 1990's at the hearing. james clapper made it clear the u.s. is in good company. >> you believe that the allies have conducted or at any time any type of espionage activity against the united states of america, our intelligence service leaders or otherwise? >> absolutely. >> he said the white house was aware the n.s.a. oversees eavesdropping all along, but may not have known specifics. >> russian leaders denying reports of spying on overseas leaders. they are accused of passing out bugged gift bags at last months g-20 summit. the report by two italian newspapers say delegates were given memory sticks and phone chargers equipped with spyware. it's unclear how many leaders received the bags or used the free bees. >> edward snowden can earn a ticket out of russia if he testifies about spying. germany are investigating reports the u.s. tapped their chancellors phone. snowden is wanted in the u.s. for revealing n.s.a. secrets. ger
. it represents information that we and our nato allies have collected in defense of our countries and in support of military operations. >> and so let me just ask you this, as you study the networks of the world, and let's just talk about the european union for a second, if i may. is it possible for chinese intelligence services military or otherwise to use networks that you would find in any nation states in the european union. >> . >> computer networks inside the european union for what they are up to. >> absolutely. >> whow about al quaida, could they use, is it possible for them to use the networks found in the european union to conduct planning operations or execution of operations? >> could. absolutely. >> and would bit in the purview of the national security agency to try to prevent those activities especially if it went through the european union and maybe even targeted at the united states or one of our allies. >> it is chairman, and it is something that we share with our allies. >> so you would collect information in those cases and share it with our allies in a way that was appropriat
on european citizens. it represents information that we and our nato allies have collected in defense of our countries and in support of military operations. >> reporter: our european allies still not satisfied with this defense. i met last night with the vice president of the european parliament who said a serious trust deficit remains and that deficit is likely to have consequences, including on a major trade agreement the two sides are discussing right now. kate and chris, you have a german delegation visiting the white house. the issue that seems to spark the most anger for the european side is not just that spying take place but it went right up to the leaders such as angela merkel. that's the issue that sparks the most anger. >> all right, jim, thank you so much. interesting, though. mike rogers always says, that's why the president has to have an encrypted blackberry and cell phone. everyone is trying to spy on president obama as well. >> we don't know how much the politics is masking the practicalities these days. >> good one. >>> another storm, not of the political nature, a real on
allegations are false. nato allies correct -- collected records and share them with the united states. the nsa director yesterday in that testimony saying that the allies were working with the nsa and some of that information was collected by the nsa itself. if you missed that, go to our video library on c-span.org and you can watch it there. director of national intelligence, james clapper yesterday, talking about what they are trying to do to assure the american public that the intelligence community is making appropriate use of these spying tools. [video clip] .> we had an alarm go off over the past months, i have declassified a series of documents related to section 702 of the fisa. to inform thehat public. the public interest in these documents out ways the additional damage to national security. these documents let our citizens see the seriousness, rigor with which the fisa court handles his responsibilities. however, in these documents, we have were had -- we have had to redact certain information, such as targets of surveillance. we will continue to declassify more documents. that is w
of its uprising, and there was nato support. my own sense is that that call was not a call for regime change in the way that was the case in iraq in 2003. it's important to think about the circumstances, at least initially, in which the call was made. a caller from ohio. i get tired of the united states and western nations being financially involved in their issues over there, when some of the oil-rich arab nations don't seem to be providing enough of their own help. the caller makes a good point, which is that it's clear from polls and other things that does notcan public have much appetite for sending significant financial resources to the middle east. frankly, nor are we in a position to continue to do that after having gone through our own domestic budget troubles. there is a fair question to be raised about whether or not the gulf countries can play more of providing thes of financial assistance necessary , and alsotransitions contributing more to the humanitarian efforts that are being undertaken on behalf of of syria. the gulf countries, with the exception of kuwait, have been
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5